The Toughest Net Neutrality Law In America

In Decenternet, News
Net Neutrality Law

California can be considered as the US capital of the toughest laws when it comes to protecting its citizens.

Last week, Gov. Jerry Brown signed the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (aka AB 375). Though the new personal data privacy law does not contain the same GDPR provisions, they are close in many aspects. It includes providing people the authority to know how their information is utilized. Also, why it is accumulated and prohibit companies from selling their data to third-parties.

Based on the California Consumer Privacy Act site, the law provides consumers the following:

  • The right to have knowledge of all information gathered by a business from a consumer;
  • The right to decline for selling information;
  • The right to remove people’s data;
  • The right to be advised  regarding the nature of the data category will be gathered before its collection and be posted of any changes;
  • Directed opt-in ahead of selling children’s data below 16 years old;
  • The right to have knowledge regarding the classifications fo third-parties with whom the information is distributed;
  • The right to recognize the kinds of sources of data from whom the information was obtained;
  • The right to know the marketing intention of data accumulation;
  • The  state Attorney General shall carry out the new data privacy law;
  • The confidential right of action when firms infringe consumer data and to make certain that these companies keep the information protected and confidential.

“Organizations should minimize their exposure in handling personal data, keeping only the personal data necessary to service direct business and legal needs. As a best practice, we encourage organizations to use archiving policies that identify instances of personal data, delete, encrypt and/or move data to more secure locations that are fully tracked,” according to Solutions at Commvault Director Patrick McGrath’s email.

The state’s new data privacy law is comparable to a measure that proponents formerly hoped to adopt on the November ballot. This will restrict huge companies like AT&T and Amazon from disseminating consumer information, especially without their consent. Likewise, Comcast, Facebook, Google, and Verizon opposed the newly-signed bill which paid $200,00 each to a lobbying group to fight the recommended ballot measure in the country which nearly replicates the new law.

The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 will take effect on January 2020. The business and tech sector believe that the repercussion might be experienced sooner. http://77.104.168.167/~fortun12/cryptocurry/news/marketing-industry-rails-at-california-consumer-privacy-act-of-2018/Key companies and edge providers are already establishing policies to address the regulations. It provides consumers more knowledge regarding and management over the online distribution of their personal information. It also authorizes California residents to file a lawsuit against a company that is shared their information against their will.

Selling of personal data to other third-companies are getting rampant even before the inplementation of EU’s GDPR. In the Decenternet platform, all confidential information are secured and protected. Besides, the system it uses is not designed to monitor or surveil its users. Consumers do not have to worry that their personal data will be distributed without their permission. The Anubis OS does not treat its users like an outlaw.

 


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